Olympic Update: Day 6

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Yet again the Olympics rarely go a day without some kind of scandal or major story as yet another controversy hit the Olympic Games in Day 6. Again the majority of the story unfolded the previous day and really the day leading up to Day 6. This time it was the boxing ring that took much of the focus in the Olympics as yet again the sport was embroiled in controversy. Boxing in the Olympics has been a decently well accepted sport for years. It has also been a launching pad for many professional boxing careers including fighters like Muhammad Ali. Boxing has also been a source of controversy in both the pro and amateur ranks almost since it started. There have been constant accusations of the sport being dirty form the bottom up as reports of corruption continue to haunt the structure of the sport. For many the amateur side of the sport is the worst offender as there are no breaks from the accusations of judges and referees being paid off. The controversy does not stop at the Olympics either as accusations have already arisen claiming that referees and judges have been much easier on the home teams than anyone else. These accusations have root in the Beijing Olympics in 2008 when the US team came in as the favorites after a great world championship performance but did not see the same success in the Olympics. In fact the Chinese had the most success in their home Olympics despite only ever winning a Bronze medal in 2004. The Chinese team would go on to win four medals in the Beijing Olympics leaving some to raise the question as to whether or not the games were actually leaning in one countries favour. In London the same seems to be happening as the British fighters have seen much better results than they are used to. Of course with the Brits it is not as obvious as they do have a storied history in the ring and it is not as amazing that they are doing well. Still many believe that the judge’s decisions are being swayed and proof of that was when Great Britain’s Anthony Ogogo defeated the top ranked fighter in the world Ievgen Khytrov in a tight battle. The Fight ended in a tie and after a countback solved nothing judges were required to make their decisions to determine who had won. It was clear that the fight was likely not a tie as Khytrov had won the fight and should have won the tiebreaker. That was not the case as Ogogo won in a judges decision giving more fuel to the doubters of the validity of the sport. This is not the only issue that the Olympics has seen in the ring though as the boxing in general has not been clean in the slightest. Fighters have regularly been seen grabbing and holding their opponents with the referees standing by. Generally a referee is to warn the fighter and then deduct points for these actions but little to nothing has been done. Only one fighter has been removed for these actions as Ali Mazaheri began grabbing and pulling his opponent forward. After a warning and two point deductions the fight was finally stopped with a disqualification in one of the only fairly judged matches in the tournament. Then it all came to a head in Day 5 when Magomed Abdulhamidov beat Satoshi Shimizu of Japan. The fight was clearly a winning one for Abdulhamidov except for one major fact as he continued to fall down in the last round. After spending most of his energy in the first two rounds Abdulhamidov seemed out of it in round three and continued to fall despite the fact that he was rarely punched hard enough. At that moment the referee should have stopped the fight as the fighter clearly could not continue. The fight continued though and Abdulhamidov took the victory against Shimizu. The Japanese fighter launched a formal inquiry that was accepted giving Shimizu the win and forcing the referee out of the Olympics. The drama never stops in the Olympics as Day 6 saw another person kicked out of the Olympics except this time it was an official. With almost 1 week of Olympics done there has been plenty to talk about while the world continues to look on wondering what is next.

 

The Canadian Story

Women’s 8 make it 2-for-2

The Canadians continued to be strong in the big boat as the Canadian women’s eight team earned the second silver medal in as many days proving that the Canadians are as always a force in the flatwater

 

Golden Opportunity Turns Bronze

Alex Bruce and Michelle Li had a great opportunity after the scandal in badminton as they got new life to earn a medal but the Japanese turned out to be too strong for them as they will not move into the gold medal match and instead move to the bronze medal match for a chance at a medal

 

Day 6 Medal Results

 

Artistic Gymnastics:

Women’s All-Around

Gold- Gabby Douglas (USA)

Silver- Viktoria Komova (Russia)

Bronze- Aliya Mustafina (Russia)

 

Archery:

Women’s Individual

Gold- Ki Bo-Bae (South Korea)

Silver- Aida Roman (Mexico)

Bronze- Mariana Avitia (Mexico)

 

Canoe/Kayak:

Men’s C2 Slalom

Gold- Tim Baillie/Etienne Scott (Great Britain)

Silver- David Florence/Richard Hounslow (Great Britain)

Bronze- Pavol Hochschorner/Peter Hochschorner (Slovakia)

 

Women’s K1 Slalom

Gold- Emilie Fre (France)

Silver- Jessica Fox (Australia)

Bronze- Maialen Chourraut (Spain)

 

Cycling:

Women’s Track- Team Sprint

Gold- Germany

Silver- China

Bronze- Australia

 

Men’s Track- Team Sprint

Gold- Great Britain

Silver- France

Bronze- Germany

 

Fencing:

Women’s Team Foil

Gold- Italy

Silver- Russia

Bronze- South Korea

 

Judo:

Women’s 78kg

Gold- Kayla Harrison (USA)

Silver- Gemma Gibbons (Great Britain)

Bronze- Audrey Tcheumeo (France)

Bronze- Mayra Aguiar (Brazil)

 

Men’s 100kg

Gold- Tuvshinbayar Naidan (Mongolia)

Silver- Tagir Khaibulaev (Russia)

Bronze- Dimitri Peters (Germany)

Bronze- Henk Grol (Netherlands)

 

Rowing:

Men’s Double Sculls

Gold- Nathan Cohen/Joseph Sullivan (New Zealand)

Silver- Alessio Sartori/Romano Battisti (Italy)

Bronze- Iztok Cop/Luka Spik (Slovenia)

 

Men’s Lightweight Four

Gold- South Africa

Silver- Great Britain

Bronze- Denmark

 

Women’s Eights

Gold- USA

Silver- Canada

Bronze- Netherlands

 

Shooting:

Men’s Double Trap

Gold- Peter Robert Russell Wilson (Great Britain)

Silver- Hakan Dahlby (Sweden)

Bronze- Vasily Mosin (Russia)

 

Swimming:

Women’s 200m Breaststroke

Gold- Rebecca Soni (USA)

Silver- Satomi Suzuki (Japan)

Bronze- Yuliya Yefimova (Russia)

 

Men’s 200m Backstroke

Gold- Tyler Clary (USA)

Silver- Kyosuke Irie (Japan)

Bronze- Ryan Lochte (USA)

 

Men’s 200m Individual Medley

Gold- Michael Phelps (USA)

Silver- Ryan Lochte (USA)

Bronze- Laszlo Cseh (Hungary)

 

Women’s 100m Freestyle

Gold- Ranomi Kromowidjojo (Netherlands)

Silver- Aliaksandra Herasimenia (Belarus)

Bronze- Tan Yi (China)

 

Table Tennis:

Men’s Singles

Gold- Jike Zhang (China)

Silver- Hao Wang (China)

Bronze- Dimitrij Ovtcharov (Germany)

 

Day 7 Medal Events

(All Time in EDT)

 

Archery:

Men’s Individual Bronze Medal Match (10:21 am)

Men’s Individual Gold Medal Match (10:37 am)

 

Athletics:

Women’s 10,000m Final (4:25 pm)

Men’s Shot Put Final (3:30 pm)

 

Badminton:

Mixed Doubles Bronze Medal Match (5:30 am)

Mixed Doubles Gold Medal Match (10:00 am)

 

Cycling:

Women’s Track- Keirin Final (1:38 pm)

Men’s Track- Team Pursuit (12:59 pm)

 

Fencing:

Men’s Team Sabre Bronze Medal Match (1:00 pm)

Men’s Team Sabre Gold Medal Match (1:45 pm)

 

Judo:

Men’s 100kg Bronze Medal Matches (9:28 am)

Men’s 100kg Gold Medal Match (11:10 am)

Women’s 78kg Bronze Medal Matches (9:00 am)

Women’s 78kg Gold Medal Match (11:00 am)

 

Rowing:

Men’s Quadruple Sculls Final (5:10 am)

Men’s Pairs Finals (5:20 am)

Women’s Double Sculls Finals (5:30 am)

 

Shooting:

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone Final (7:00 am)

Men’s 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Final (9:30 am)

 

Swimming:

Women’s 200m Backstroke Final (2:30 pm)

Men’s 100m Butterfly Final (2:38 pm)

Women’s 800m Freestyle Final (2:45 pm)

Men’s 50m Freestyle Final (3:09 pm)

 

Trampoline:

Men’s Individual Trampoline Final (10:26 am)

 

Weightlifting:

Women’s 75kg Final (10:30 am)

Men’s 85kg Final (2:00 pm)

 

Medal Table

#

Country

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

1 USA

18

9

10

37

2 USA

18

11

5

34

3 Japan

2

6

11

19

4 Germany

4

8

5

17

5 Russia

3

6

8

17

6 France

6

4

6

16

7 Great Britain

5

6

4

15

8 South Korea

7

2

5

14

9 Italy

4

5

2

11

10 Australia

1

7

3

11

11 Canada

0

2

5

7

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 168 other followers

%d bloggers like this: