HHOF Profile: Pat Quinn

o-pat-quinn-hockey-facebookIn the world of coaching, there are so many theories about how to do things but there is always one that seems to consistently equal success.

It has been proven over and over as the best way to success from behind the bench is to get the players to play for you.

It seems like a simple task but for so many coaches it seems almost impossible as there have been plenty of coaches who have come and gone without any success.

There are plenty of ways to get there as coaches have found ways to get to their players and have them buy into a strategy.

It is a tough thing as coaches need to play psychologist and they need to know when it is a time to yell and when it is a time to calm everyone down.

When a coach simply yells everything all the time it can bring some intensity to a team and can lead to success.

That success is very short lived though as at a certain point the yelling gets old and the players don’t respond.

Staying calm the entire time can also lead to success as it doesn’t get players too hyped up and keeps them level-headed.

That too won’t last though as eventually the players will walk over that coach and will stay at a level that simply doesn’t work in hockey for every game.

Finding that balance is key to becoming a great coach in any league including the NHL where coaches are always trying to find that balance.

Many coaches struggle to find that balance and work hard to get there every team that they coach for.

Then there are those people who just seem to have the aura about them that they have to do almost nothing to get people to play for them.

These coaches are the ones that every player loves to play for as they look up to the coach and want to win for the coach rather than just for the teams.

These coaches have what every good coach needs and that is a buy-in from all of the players that are playing for them.2605430

One of these coaches who just has that immediate buy-in as soon as he walks into a locker room was Pat Quinn.

Quinn was a coach for the players and that was large because he was the type of player that other players loved.

He was never the greatest hockey player but he was big and rough and he stood up for his teammates.

He took that reputation into coaching where it seemed like he was one of the most beloved coaches in the NHL.

When he left cities it was rarely because he lost a locker room and more because he simply didn’t win in the NHL.

He rarely had small stints in cities, aside from his last year in Edmonton, which is a perfect expression of how much he was loved.

Every time he left it was usually because the team simply needed a change and not because he had lost the locker room.

Quinn could never really find the massive successes in the NHL as he never won a Stanley Cup championship.

It didn’t stop him from being that coach that every player wanted to play for and he took that to the international stage.

That is where he had his most success as he took Team Canada to multiple championships at multiple levels with the best players in the world.

His ability to be that coach that everyone wants to play for led to plenty of success in the NHL and although he never won a Stanley Cup he still left the game as one of the greatest ever.

That is why he will enter the Hockey Hall of Fame as one of the greatest coaches and one of the greatest hockey people ever.

It is disappointing that he won’t be able to see it after his death in 2014 but he will remain in the hall forever among the best of the best.

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